• Ejuen Armstrong

Who's That Girl? Placing Your Heroine

Can readers related to your female lead?


If you’re writing a romance from the female's Point of View (POV), then she has to be numero uno. Number One, first and foremost. The reader must like her, laugh with her, share her anxieties, fears, and desire to give the hero what for on her behalf as and when required.


I thought it would be nice to break this rule in my book, Love Chained, which is predominantly from the hero's POV. As unfair as it seems, a hero with negative traits will be given far more leeway than a heroine with negative traits. So be careful here.


In general readers tend to prefer a heroine with a bit of backbone. Even among staid and proper society, she’s got to have some stand-out traits.


She must also be able to wield power over the hero, even if she is totally unaware of it.

The Victorian Ladette


Elizabeth Bennett, of Pride and Prejudice, clomping on foot through the muddy fields to see her sister Jane who is holed up sick at the Bingley household, always springs to mind in such instances.


Even though her mama's capricious plotting was behind that, and Elizabeth would have preferred to go in the family carriage, it still imparts that idea that Elizabeth is of independent enough mind to disregard any social niceties she doesn't care for. If you're a fan of period you'll understand what sticklers they were for a certain level of etiquette.


However you place your heroine, it's essential that the audience can relate to her.

Giving Your Character Character


If the heroine starts off as a spoilt cow, then we should see her mature as the book goes on, or find out that she is, beneath that mean alias, really Storm or Catwoman - but with some vulnerable traits.


She can be rich or poor, but she must have some kind of innate qualities to make the reader relate to her from the outset. She must also be able to wield power over the hero, even if she is totally unaware of it.


Make sure you've plotted those personality traits and characteristics from the beginning.

However you place your heroine, it's essential that the audience can relate to her. And that she conveys all the elements of the character development that you want your readers to know. She is one of the major drivers for the story. Make sure you've plotted those personality traits and characteristics from the beginning. Even if there are some unexpected side turns further along, the reader is committed to the adventure and will be willing to take them with her.


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